Brand
Brand
Brand
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Amazon Echo Link B0798DVZCY

Overall rating 3 stars
3 from 20 reviews
Amazon
Specifications
Compatibility
Amazon Echo Link
Product Name
Echo Link
Model Number
B0798DVZCY
Color
Charcoal
Brand
Amazon
Color Category
Black
Product Depth
4.5 inches
Specifications
Compatibility:
Amazon Echo Link
Product Name:
Echo Link
Model Number:
B0798DVZCY
Color:
Charcoal
Brand:
Amazon
Color Category:
Black
Product Depth:
4.5 inches
The Amazon company offers users to check out B0798DVZCY. The features of B0798DVZCY, in addition to their interesting design solution, make us pleased with their performance and functionality. Best solution for both house and office. Many customers already appreciated and left B0798DVZCY reviews available on our service. Price comparison, that is also offered by our service, helps profitably purchase Amazon B0798DVZCY. Buy (Amazon B0798DVZCY or Echo Link) with benefits.

Amazon Echo Link B0798DVZCY Overview

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Amazon taps the audiophile market with Echo Link, Echo Link Amp | Unboxing & Impressions | ETPanache

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Reviews

3/5
Overall rating 3 stars
20 reviews
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8
Overall rating 2 stars
January 27, 2019

Comment:

UPDATE: It’s unclear whether the Echo Link supports HD quality from Amazon Music. Streaming specs aren’t available from the Android app and Amazon only says Echo 2nd Generation supports HD. Also, the Android app doesn’t allow any display or management of the play queue when streaming to the Echo Link. It does allow play queue control when streaming to Chromecast, but Amazon states that HD is currently unavailable for that. Thanks again for a botched product. I’ll stick with using TIDAL and Chromecast.Volume and other controls by voice through Echo devices is bad. If music is playing and you’re not directly next to the Echo device it’s totally hit-or-miss whether the command is correctly followed. Even if it is, volume control is way to crude with only whole number levels 1-10. The knob on the Link seems to have 30 levels, which is a reasonable level of precision. Initially I got around this issue by using an Echo Remote Control but Amazon suddenly removed support for its use with Link after I bought 2 remotes. Then I started controlling volume through the Alexa app on my phone, but now that doesn’t work when playing audio through any of the input jacks. Why did Amazon suddenly remove this capability? If the volume for audio from input jacks can be controlled by the know why not also control it from the app? This used to work.So bottom line: Amazon doesn’t care about customers and will remove capabilities without explanation. If you want a streaming player/preamp go buy a real audio device from Yamaha, Bluesound, Marantz, Emotiva, etc.My suggestion: get a Link if you’re OK with overpaying a bit to solve an immediate need. Wait if you’re price sensitive, your current setup is satisfactory and you have the patience for a more complete Alexa hi-fi solution to come along.I think Amazon miscalculated their recent releases for the target market of people seeking high-quality Alexa streaming. The Link fits in well with my current audio systems, but it’s too expensive for its limited capability compared with other streaming players, such as Yamaha and Bluesound. If I were starting from scratch I’d pay more for a full-functioning streaming preamp or player, especially since 3rd-party Alexa integration will eventually catch up to what can be done with music services on Echo devices. Bluesound may get there, but reviews for their recent Alexa integration are pretty bad.By comparison, Echo Input looks like a strange device since it’s aimed at hi-fi users but it’s only a stripped down Dot. I would think that the market for Echo Input would be larger if it had a quality DAC, 2-way AptX HD, and a combined 3.5mm analog/mini-TOSLINK jack. At something like a $95 price-point those seeking quality audio would buy it, especially now that CCA is no more. Then the Link could have been designed as a more capable preamp at a higher price. I think the current product positioning will result in disappointing unit sales for both.I bought two Echo Links, one for my desktop Audioengine HD3 powered speakers and one for my 1980s component system (Adcom -555 preamp and amp, B&W Matrix 3 Series 2 speakers). I have a CCA connected by optical to each Link with analog out going to my systems.Previously CCA had clearly superior analog output than the Dot, which was especially noticeable with classical and opera. Now they are pretty much equal in quality. Whatever DAC, signal path and circuitry improvements were made to the Link make a significant difference. I don’t have preamps with digital inputs or external DACs, so I can’t compare Link’s DAC with those. But thus far I’m satisfied.The Link can work as a very limited digital preamp. There’s no explicit switching among sources. It outputs one source at a time when a signal is detected based on the following priority: Bluetooth, Alexa, coax, optical and RCA. For example, if you have a source playing through optical and you start streaming through Alexa, Link output will switch to Alexa since it has a higher priority. From what I can tell this doesn’t degrade digital signal quality, although best practice would be to only have one active signal at a time. I haven’t used the RCA inputs since it’s best for analog sources to go directly to my preamp.Right now this works for me because I use both Alexa and Chromecast. Chromecast is more universal for streaming from any app or through the Chrome browser. But I find Alexa voice control for media superior. Also, right now TIDAL is stuck between the 2 platforms: no voice control for CCA and no streaming from the app for Alexa. So you can’t stream TIDAL custom playlists or queues through Alexa and you can’t ask for a track, album or artist on Google Home devices. Also, now that CCA is discontinued it may be important to keep a foot-in-the-door with Alexa. If Google doesn’t care about hi-fi audio then streaming services and device manufacturers may discontinue Chromecast integration, or stop developing CCA improvements (such as MQA).A couple of gripes about the Link: like the Dot the analog output level is far too low. If I have the Link set at Level 8, I need to turn my preamp level way too high for my other components (CD, turntable, tuner). It’s quite nasty if I forget to turn the volume down when switching sources. On my desktop system, my computer’s USB output is set to only 10%-15% to match Level 8 on the Link with my HD3 speakers turned almost to the max. Using the Link’s volume control just doesn’t work well if you have multiple sources connected to your hi-fi. Amazon should have boosted the line level output and added an option for fixed volume for those who only want to use external components for volume control.Also, the Link should include an Echo Remote, and perhaps integral buttons for mute, pause/play and next/previous. Come on Amazon, $200 media devices should come with remotes that only cost a couple bucks to make. You include remotes with your much cheaper Fire TV sticks. With the Link connected to a hi-fi system most users will not be within easy reach. Yelling across the room at a Dot doesn’t cut it, or if you’re at your desk and a phone call comes in it’s much simpler to just hit a “Pause” button. Also, volume control is way too crude by voice. The remote control uses intermediate levels between whole numbers. On that note, it would be nice if voice commands like “a little softer/a little louder” would tweak volume by only a single increment between whole numbers.So, basically it’s working for me but the gaps in function and product design are a bit frustrating.

Overall rating 1 stars
February 16, 2019

Comment:

I returned this item spent several hours trying to get this to function with no success and a lot of frustration

Overall rating 5 stars
March 11, 2019

Comment:

I bought 4 Echo Spots and 2 Echo Links — I must say, what Amazon provided in the way of instructions (both in the box and on-line) must be considered totally insufficient documentation.Here’s the story: I installed the two Echo Links, and got thru set-up perfectly.  When I told one of my Echo Spots to play music on one Link or the other, it worked fine IF I plugged headphones in to the Link.  But the DIGITAL OUTPUTS did not seem to work at all. So the natural question that came to mind was: what SPDIF format is used on these digital outputs?  There is no documentation on this at all!  What is the sampling frequency and bit depth?  48 x 16?  96 x 24?  Amazon should tell us! And, unbelievably, when I spoke to an Amazon Customer Service rep on the phone, the rep said “Developers here will not provide you with that information”. This really happened!With the help of a home automation pro, I figured it out with a protocol analyzer: It’s 2-channel LPCM at 48 x 16. Just like the old Apple iPod default uncompressed format. (Ordinary CDs are 44.1 x 16, for comparison, and most hi-res files are 96 x 24). With this setting known, I got both SPDIF outputs (optical and coax) on both Links working great, and the sound quality is excellent.So I revised my original 1-star review to this 5-star review. I really like what I hear. “Alexa, play Queen on Living Room Rig”. Nice.

Overall rating 5 stars
March 23, 2019

Comment:

This is a great way to bring your AV receiver into your hole home Alexa music. It’s not a stand alone Echo, it’s just a link to your Echo and for that it’s great.

Overall rating 1 stars
March 26, 2019

Comment:

Go with a Sonos. This thing is just inadequate. For starters, you must control it via Alexa (there is no stand-alone app), and Alexa is a lousy music player. Support for seeing what’s playing from inside the Alexa phone app is marginal. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t. Amazon’s Apple-Music skill is marginal at best, Clearly, they want to force you into Amazon Music. Setting it up is far from intuitive. It loses its mind every few weeks and won’t stop playing (you have to cycle the power to get it to shut up). You can’t start playing in one room, and then turn it off or even control the volume from another. You have to do everything from a single echo. Sound quality is adequate, for what that’s worth.The Sonos doesn’t lack problems, but it has fewer of them than the Link. For example, the Sonos crashes (to the cycle-the-power stage) if you try to play a large Apple-music library on random through the Sonos app. I have a pair of Sonos Ones operating as a single stereo pair, and that works pretty well, and that’s connected to an older Sonos Connect. The Alexa support in the One is great. The microphones are vastly better than those on the Dot for one thing. The Sonos One supports Airplay 2, so I can play apple music from my phone using the Music app and cast it to to the Sonos, which is inelegant, but it does get around the bug. The One is bound to the Connect, so I have whole-house music as well.

Overall rating 1 stars
April 10, 2019

Comment:

I have numerous Echo Spot, Echo Show and Echo Plus devices. They all do an excellent job, and the Plus and Show have surprisingly good sound. The Sonos One is far superior to the Plus with Echo Sub, but that’s not because the Plus is a failure.Hoping for the domestic friendliness of Alex to be available through a serious audio system, I have the Toslink digital output of an Echo Link feeding an Aesthetix Romulus CD/DAC and Bel Canto amplifiers into GoldenEar Triton One.R speakers.The sound is astonishingly irritating and obnoxious. I suggest that if one has to have Alexa on a good hi-fi, use Bluesound or HEOS or other audio equipment — or simply use the analog output of an Echo Input or Echo DOT — don’t bother thinking that using the Echo Link into a good DAC will give you worthwhile sound.See the What HiFi review of the Echo Link Amp for another opinion regarding the Echo Link being a surprising failure.

Overall rating 3 stars
April 28, 2019

Comment:

I’ve been using a Link almost daily for a few weeks, and I am both very disappointed that it didn’t fulfill the purpose I bought it for, but am a surprised with the role it finally took on. I had bought the Link – as I’m sure most people do – to have a higher-quality output for my home audio system with the convenience of an Echo. However, it is inherently limited in it’s audio quality as I believe at this point is does not work with Tidal Masters or Deezer Hifi, which means 320kbps is still the limit in streaming resolution. The optical output gives the option for an external DAC, and I’ve found the Link’s own analog output to be disappointing. I actually prefer the sound of previous Echos, especially the gen 2 Dot which I much prefer the sound of and was a fifth of the price. The Link has a flatter response curve but is also lifeless and dull. It is right on verge of being harsh and fatiguing.So, for your average streaming of Spotify without being too concerned with great quality, it’s maybe passable but way overpriced. But in the other areas of being an Echo it is frustratingly limited. No remote pairing and no internal microphone. The lack of ability to use an Alexa Voice Remote is maddening in its omission. To push music through the Link a second Echo has to be used. It can set to be the preferred output for a group, but Alexa speaks and listens through the other Echo. Changing tracks must be done through that Echo, which means having to yell over the music to have it hear me, and the music does not quiet for my voice. To change to the next track, the second Echo has to be used. To adjust volume without touching the Link, a second Echo has to be used. It all feels unpolished and difficult. Occasionally, telling the second Echo to stop the music will make it stop on the Link and for some reason it just switches to playing on the second Echo. The Link sometimes gets left out of playing through a speaker group. And connecting to a bluetooth device has to be done by app, there’s no way I’ve found to tell the second Echo to pair the Link to bluetooth by voice. It all feels really half-baked.So it moved out of my main audio system. It just didn’t bring the convenience of any other Echo device, and became decidedly more complicated. I don’t mind getting up to flip a record or tape, but the whole point of Alexa devices is their beautiful ability to be controlled by voice from a distance, at least for me. It means being able to get work done and move around the house while being able to have some control over the music playing. The Link doesn’t really allow that. Even just being able to push “skip forward” on a remote would be a huge improvement.But before packing it up and shipping it back, I tried using with my computer as a volume control for a pair of powered speakers. And here it does much better. The volume knob is within easy reach. I run optical from the computer to the Link, and it sounds good with my B&O S3s that punch up the sound. They can get very bass-heavy sitting on a thin-topped desk, but the Link’s EQ let’s me tailor the sound a bit. The headphone jack on the front sounds good also. It adds the ability to still use my desk speakers even if the computer is off through bluetooth, Spotify Connect or a second Echo. I really like it. But some limitations still persist: EQ modes are not supported – such as Night Mode – which would be really helpful, nor does it automatically reconnect to bluetooth speakers after unplugging a pair of headphones. Not deal-breakers, but still glaring omissions.I would love to use the Link as I intended in a home audio system, but it’s lack of accessibility, polish and sound really doesn’t make it a good fit. It’s just too hard to use without the added benefit of quality sound. But in certain uses – such as a volume knob with some bells and whistles paired with punchy active speakers – it is honestly a pretty useful component. Of course, I have hope the firmware updates will fix many of these problems, and that someday it can find its place next to the main system. But for now its limitations only barely justify its cost. And honestly it may not for many. I think the tepid overall rating it has is fair at this point.

Overall rating 3 stars
September 27, 2019

Comment:

This product will probably deliver fine performance at an affordable price for the vast majority of people who buy it; for example, those who are satisfied listening to MP3s and Amazon’s regular music services. However, if your purpose is to run it into a outboard DAC and/or into a more high priced stereo system, then you may not be satisfied with the sound quality.I bought it to listen to the new Amazon HD service, so sound quality is important. I set it up using an optical cable to connect to an external DAC from there into my home hi fi system. I knew there was going to be problem when I realized that the volume control was active on what should have been a circuit that bypassed the internal pre-amp. But apparently it did not. Probably a necessary economy to hit the $200 price point, but a harbinger of what my comparative listening tests would reveal: it does not deliver sound quality that can do justice to the new Amazon HD service.So if you want to use and fully enjoy Amazon HD, then you may find it necessary to buy higher priced components from manufacturers like Marantz or Denon that include this compatibility in their equipment. For me that was a deal breaker because I’m not ready to buy new equipment and was looking for a suitable workaround. Unfortunately the Echo Link isn’t it. Perhaps Amazon will eventually release a unit at a higher price point that delivers on the sonic potential of its new HD music service.

Overall rating 1 stars
October 6, 2019

Comment:

On the main page it lists – Sample rates of 44.1, 48.0, 88.2, and 96.0 kHz are supported over optical and coaxial digital inputs, but on the support page it says that the output only supports up to 16bit 48Khz. This is misleading and not hi-fi, as their own Amazon Ultra HD music wont play via this device (which supports up to 192 kHz tracks). At this price point that’s just not going to cut it. Returned it already.

Overall rating 1 stars
October 19, 2019

Comment:

The Alexa integration is the reason for buying this streamer. My DAC shows that the Echo Link has a software or hardware limit of 16/48. While Amazon Music HD and Tidal MQA streams up to 24/96 from my PC to my Schiit Yggy dac, it only streams up to 16/48 from the Echo Link to my dac.The readout on the Schiit Yggy dac is pretty clear and it’s easy to read the quality of the stream.I went back to Tidal to try to see if the Echo Link would play Tidal’s MQA files at a higher resolution but it does not. It’s clear the Echo Link is limited to 16/48.I can’t recommend this streamer to an audio enthusiast and I’m going to give away or sell mine and I’ll get a legit music streamer. One that does not limit the quality of my music. Especially, since I’m paying a monthly fee for higher quality.Playing my music through the Echo Link basically turns my high quality streams into standard quality steams, making me ask: Why am I paying extra for high quality music if my Echo Link is simply going to convert them back to low quality streams?

Description
Echo Link is an Echo companion that connects your home hi-fi stereo system to streaming music services. Echo Link is designed to connect to a receiver or amplifier or directly to powered speakers. It includes 5 lines out (analog, optical, coax, headphone 3.5mm, subwoofer) and 3 lines in (analog, optical, coax) to connect other audio components. Echo Link includes a volume knob for granular control, an ethernet port for reliable connectivity, and offers full Echo multi-room music support.
Details
Details
Key Specs
Compatibility Amazon Echo Link
General
Product Name Echo Link
Model Number B0798DVZCY
Color Charcoal
Brand Amazon
Color Category Black
Dimension
Product Depth 4.5 inches
Product Width 2.6 inches
Product Height 5.3 inches
Warranty
Manufacturer's Warranty - Parts 1 Year
Manufacturer's Warranty - Labor 1 Year
Other
Accessory Type Power cord
UPC 841667152615
Model Compatibility Multiple digital and analog inputs and outputs ensure compatibility with your existing stereo equipment
The Amazon company offers users to check out B0798DVZCY. The features of B0798DVZCY, in addition to their interesting design solution, make us pleased with their performance and functionality. Best solution for both house and office. Many customers already appreciated and left B0798DVZCY reviews available on our service. Price comparison, that is also offered by our service, helps profitably purchase Amazon B0798DVZCY. Buy (Amazon B0798DVZCY or Echo Link) with benefits.
My review Amazon Echo Link B0798DVZCY

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