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Brand
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Celestron Ultima 65 18-55x 45 Degree Spotting Scope 52248

Overall rating 4 stars
4 from 10 reviews
Celestron
Specifications
Product Name
Ultima 65 18-55x 45 Degree Spotting Scope
Color
Green
Color Category
Green
Model Number
52248
Brand
Celestron
Product Depth
5 inches
Product Height
5 inches
Specifications
Product Name:
Ultima 65 18-55x 45 Degree Spotting Scope
Color:
Green
Color Category:
Green
Model Number:
52248
Brand:
Celestron
Product Depth:
5 inches
Product Height:
5 inches
The Celestron company offers users to check out 52248. The features of 52248, in addition to their interesting design solution, make us pleased with their performance and functionality. Best solution for both house and office. Many customers already appreciated and left 52248 reviews available on our service. Price comparison, that is also offered by our service, helps profitably purchase Celestron 52248. Buy (Celestron 52248 or Ultima 65 18-55x 45 Degree Spotting Scope) with benefits.

Celestron Ultima 65 18-55x 45 Degree Spotting Scope 52248 Overview

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Reviews

4/5
Overall rating 4 stars
10 reviews
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Overall rating 4 stars
August 26, 2016

Comment:

This is a good scope for the money, and much better than the other ones I looked at (the Barska Colorado 20×60 and the Vivitar Terrain 20×60). At 20x, the picture is excellent. It is okay at 40x, and has a lot of blue fringing at 60x. Eye relief is a little small, even without glasses, and especially at higher magnifications. This scope definitely needs a good tripod. I thought the cheap one I had would do, but it doesn’t. Picture jumps so much you can’t even focus at higher magnifications, and the slightest breeze or adjustment sends everything bouncing up and down. I borrowed a more stable tripod from a friend, and the scope performs much better. I probably need to buy a good tripod, but am loath to spend almost as much as the scope was to get a decent one. The pictures attached all go from 20x-40x-60x, with my friend’s tripod, and a smartphone adaptor attached to the scope.

Overall rating 4 stars
September 9, 2016

Comment:

A handful of negative reviews made me pause before ordering this product. Finally, I reasoned: “It’s Amazon. If I don’t like it, I’ll send it back”. I took delivery today. After playing with it for an hour or so, I was puzzled as to why some reviewers said the image was not clear. Maybe Celestron has some QC problems but the clarity and brightness on my unit are much better than I expected. My main reason for buying was to view bullet holes at 100 and 200 yards. While I haven’t been to the range yet, I have no doubt it will serve that purpose perfectly. I can see cars moving on a bridge 15 miles away and can read a license plate at 2400 feet.On the negative side, the scope is a little cheap in places. The threads on the eye piece are plastic and could easily be stripped by an impatient ham handed user. Likewise, the objective lens cover locks in place but is pretty easily dislodged. The included case has zero padding. Some reviewers complained about no eye relief at 60 power. This is true. Glasses must be removed at higher magnifications. I had no problem focusing without my glasses but don’t know if this will be true for all prescriptions.The bottom line: For $169.00 this scope is a bargain. If you handle it carefully, I would expect a good long service life.

Overall rating 5 stars
January 21, 2017

Comment:

I use spotting scopes for several purposes: Star Gazing, Looking around the valley, target shooting, enjoying the moon, and bird watching from home. We live on a mountain view home with a moderate sized piece of land.A nylon carrying bag is a provided but it is not protective in the sense of drops or shock. The covers for the objective and eyepiece are rudimentary.This scope doesn’t come with a tripod. It needs a heavyweight stable base to work well, particularly at high magnification. This has a stabilizing bar that gives a more secure feel.The zoom is functional, and it does work out to the highest level. However, due to effects of sun, it can make for an indistinct view. The focus is adjusted in the front part of the body. The zoom is adjusted just under the eyepiece. For the money, it’s a great quality scope. It’s not a Swarovski or Vortex, but it’s good enough for me.I can sight buildings and tractor trailer trucks several miles away. I can see the street conditions a few miles away. The scope works well out to 150 yards. There weren’t any targets available at 250 yards. I could see shoot and see hits very distinctly.The biggest and major negative is size and weight. It’s bigger than the average more practical scope, but I’m adaptable. I purchased a large carbon fiber tripod for this and it works extremely well.Overall, I’m very pleased.

Overall rating 2 stars
March 24, 2017

Comment:

I am pretty experienced with many scopes for astronomy and wildlife; I have expensive and cheap ones, and usually know what to expect when I buy optics. I bought this because I needed a relatively inexpensive scope to take camping and in situations where it could be damaged or stolen. Overall, I am unhappy with the optical quality. The large objective makes a very bright image this is great and why I picked it. It seems fairly rugged for the price. However, I find that it is only useful at the very lowest 20X magnification. At that magnification, the images are pretty good. However, the decrease in quality with increased magnification is very rapid. It is not unusual for sharpness to degrade with magnification, but on this scope the degradation is dramatic. It also suffers from significant color fringing (chromatic aberration) that also, rapidly degrades with increased magnification. The focus control is quite coarse, so it is difficult to get a perfect focus. Another disappointment is the “eye relief”. This is the distance the eye must be from the eyepiece. On this scope, it is hard to see the whole field of view with glasses. So, I recommend if you need need a bright image, but only at low magnifications. It is a very poor performer for looking at the moon or planets, also. I haven’t checked it out on the shooting range, it might work out a little better there.

Overall rating 4 stars
January 5, 2018

Comment:

I picked up the Celestron 52250 80mm Ultimate Zoom Spotting Scope to use sighting in targets at 100 yards. Previously, I purchased and compared three inexpensive 20-60X60 scopes. The chromatic aberration and overall quality of those scopes was horrible. The brands tested were SVBONY, ENKEEO and AOMEKIE all ordered from Amazon. Don’t waste your time or money on any of those.The Celestron scope came well packaged with only one small ding and tear in the container. This did not impact the contents. It came with an instruction pamphlet, small lens cloth, and ocular lens inside a plastic tube hard case with it’s own separate nylon carry case. The scope also comes with a nylon carry case however it’s not padded and would not provide any significant degree of protection against drops. You can, however, still use the scope for viewing with the cover on by simply unzipping and exposing the objective and ocular lens. I sorta like this feature. The scope is waterproof and has a BAK4 prism according to the manual. I was unable to find any verification either in the user manual or Celestron webpage that this scope is nitrogen or argon purged.The body of the scope appears to be a metal alloy with the rear portion rubberized. The ocular lens threads on to the body and can be stored separately in its own hard plastic tube as mentioned. Eye relief is achieved by a rubber eyepiece grommet that you fold up or down. The magnification ring on the ocular is smooth and crisp as was the focus knob. The objective lens comes with a clip on style lens cap. There is no pull out sun shade on the objective lens. That’s a bummer.I mounted the scope on a camera tripod to test it and immediately noticed the scope is forward weighted and tippy- in other words not balanced very well. Therefore using a sturdy tripod is critical with this scope. The images from this scope were excellent considering the the price. As with most scopes in this price range image quality at lower magnifications produce better views. There was some chromatic aberration noted but nothing I would consider outrageous. I believe it will do just fine as a range spotter and even a grab-and-go for some light bird watching.Pros- Inexpensive, decent build quality, ability to swap out ocular lens, good “bang for the buck”.Cons- No sun shade on objective lens, non-padded carry case, forward weighted (tippy) design.Hope this helps.

Overall rating 5 stars
April 23, 2018

Comment:

Excellent

Overall rating 5 stars
August 16, 2018

Comment:

I purchased the Celestron 18-55×65 45° spotting scope used in “Very Good” condition from Amazon for $75. It came in the box in all original packaging, and is brand new insofar as I can tell; something to keep in mind when you read the rest of my review. $75 for this scope in seemingly new condition is a great bargain. At that price, and even up to $90, I would say this is a no brainer, and worthy of a 5-star review. Would I purchase new for ~$115? Yes, probably. The relatively low price, functionality, good build quality, and definite fun factor makes this scope a great option depending on what you are trying to achieve with its use. Why minus a star?– noticeable purple fringing at just over half the zoom capacity.I was originally looking at the 80mm version, knowing that the larger field of view and brightness it would provide would mean better performance, especially in the high zoom range. I was talked out of it by a friend who has a 80mm scope, and told me it wasn’t worth the added bulk and weight for the price, especially when considering my intended non-professional use. For some background, I have a $400 pair 8×42 binoculars that can’t even compare to all of the other cheaper 8×25, 10×42, porro prisms, etc. binoculars I’ve owned throughout the years without expensive glass or any fancy coatings. Once I got the 8x42s in my hands, I never wanted to go back to anything less. The brightness, large field of view, and special coatings really do make a difference. That said, when I got the expensive 8x42s I was using them professionally doing bird nesting surveys, where their light-weight and expensive properties really did come in play. I also later got to use a pair of Swarovski EL 10×42 binoculars while doing seabird monitoring/population and productivity counts, and those were by far the best set of binoculars I’ve ever seen. Later, I also got to use a Zeiss spotting cope for work that was very impressive, but also very expensive.My point is, once you’ve had a chance to use the greatest, it can be annoying to have to go with anything less, and so I don’t want my review to be tainted in comparison to these high-end models because it’s like comparing apples to oranges when you go from the $100 to $400-$2500 price range. Now that I’m no longer in that line of work, I don’t need (and also don’t want to spend so much) on high end optics (though I do admit I want them…). I mostly wanted a spotting scope, however, for higher magnification viewing of birds at feeders in my backyard, and to allow my young son’s the opportunity to see wildlife closer up. I remember not being able to really use binoculars properly at their age, and always found myself closing one eye to look through only one objective since I could never get my vision to line up. Focusing clearly was always an issue, and then there was hand-shake, all of which made binoculars not so fun to use. I see them fiddling and struggling to use binoculars as well, and with a scope my hope is to set it up on a stable tripod pointed right at a feeder and have them only have to move the focus ring slightly– a decent scope at this price range was exactly what I was looking for. I am an amateur photographer, so already have a couple nice and steady tripods to put to use, which is just as important to have for a scope, and should be factored into your purchasing decision (I wouldn’t spend less than $100 on a tripod– just not worth it).OK, now onto the scope itself. It seems well weighted and well balanced, with decent ergonomics and good housing. I like the advertised waterproofness, and hope that it lives up to that claim. Focus ring is smooth, but zoom ring not so much. I find myself wanting to turn at the attachment point of the eyepiece instead of further up closer to the end where it is located. The zoom ring is also stiff, but I imagine it will loosen up in time. Last about the zoom, it’s only textured metal, and I’d prefer either a rubberized ring or tab/lever type zoom, but that’s not expected in this price range. Other reviewer(s) have mentioned that it would be nice to have a quick focus along with a fine tune focus knob, but as nice as that would be, for me it’s really not expected at this price range.Optical clarity is generally good. This scope really shines in the 18-30 zoom range, but starts to drop off in clarity and (dramatically) in field of view once you get to about 35x. Purple fringing is also noticeable around 35x, getting more obvious in the 40s, and is terrible in the 50s. Field of view up to 30x is full, which was expected since it’s a 65 objective scope (light availability and field of view is expected to drop off at anything below a 1:5 magnification/objective ratio).Eye relief is perfectly fine, at least for me, and is worth mentioning since reviews seem mixed about this topic. I wear eyeglasses and have astigmatism, so I can’t get scopes or binoculars to focus with full clarity without my glasses. Having enough eye relief is therefore a requirement, and I can focus clearly at all zoom levels with this scope. I’d imagine that some of the negative reviews about eye relief could involve not pulling back the rubber eye-cup. I’ve found that without pulling back the eye-cup, I can still focus the scope with my glasses on at 18x, but once I start zooming I need to get closer and pulling back the eye-cup is a necessity. Another option is to remove the rubber eye-cup altogether; I accidentally removed mine while fiddling with it. What I don’t like about having to “peal back” the eye-cup is that it’s annoying to switch over viewing with non-eyeglass wearers that prefer the better light eliminating properties of looking through the eye-cup. And when viewing birds, switching over when sharing the scope is a constant. I also imagine that over time with repeated folds it will eventually break down and fall off, but time will tell. On my nicer binoculars this is solved by having eye-cups that twist up and down, which is a great design, but again, not expected at this price point.Last thing I want to mention about this spotting scope is the “finder scope”. While using it today I was thinking how I wish it had a basic finder scope, since it can be difficult to track down where birds have landed not too far away, even at 18x, and especially when using in tight spaces such as my backyard. Then I noticed on the left side of the scope it has “finder scope” in the form of a straw-like appendage attached to the upper left side of the body. No optics involved, which makes sense at this zoom range. Your naked eye works just fine to point the scope close enough in the right direction to find what you want to look at before looking through the lens. When I first saw that appendage I thought it was for adding some type of accessory. I actually thought at one point that perhaps it’s an attachment point for a finder scope, but then realized, duh, it is the finder scope itself! Maybe obvious to some or most, but not to me at first, so thought I’d mention it.Overall I think this was a great purchase, especially at $75, but I would probably pay another $40 to get one now that I have had the chance to use it. I feel that all of the trade offs are fair and expected at this price point, and that overall the scope is very good for my intended purchase. The main thing I would like improved is the purple fringing and clarity at higher zoom. Light and field of view fall off was expected based on the specs, but I wasn’t expecting purple fringing and soft edges to occur until the very highest zoom range. That said, it’s a fair trade off for the price, and for my backyard birding and other intended uses, I will only rarely be using it in the 35-55 zoom range anyway.***** UPDATE *****After having some more time to use this scope, I’ve updated my review from 4 to 5 stars. The reason is that it is actually quite sharp at full zoom, and I had initially thought it wasn’t due to other obstructions altering the view, such as heat waves and poor air quality. I had the chance of using the scope in the afternoon, viewing objects not in direct sunlight, and was able to get perfectly clear imaging all the way to 55x, without soft edges and without purple fringing (which is usually an aberration caused by too much sun light). The field of view is also full from 18x all the way to 55x. I realized what I had been doing was not getting my eye close enough to the objective when in the higher zoom ranges. The eye relief is actually not as good as I had hoped and thought, and in order to see the full field of view I really have to squash my eye glasses right up to the lens and press down a bit. It is do-able, but not as comfortable or easy as it could be if there was more eye relief. But although eye relief is not as good as I originally thought, at least there are no issues with minimized field of view or soft edges as I had thought was the case before.Based on high clarity in ideal conditions, I had to go back and change my initial 4-star review to 5. The limits of this lens do not apply all of the time and do not apply to everyone (i.e., non-eye glass wearers), and it’s not the fault of the scope for not having high end lens coatings or HD glass; those features are aptly found on more expensive lenses. As expected, this scope doesn’t do more than it’s advertised to do, and does exactly what it is advertised to do at a very reasonable price and with a nice form to function ratio.

Overall rating 5 stars
October 8, 2018

Comment:

I was on the fence of spending the money and getting a Vortex spotting scope. The main reason why is because Vortex has a lifetime warranty on their products. You break it for whatever reason, they’ll replace it for free. But that Vortex spotting scope was about $400. I figured since I normally try to take care of my stuff and don’t thrash it, I’d take my chances on the more less expensive Celestron spotting scope ($139).I would mainly use the spotting scope for when I sight in a rifle and occasionally get a closer look at some of the wildlife in my backyard. Maybe look at the moon. So my use of the spotting scope would be minimal.I received my spotting scope and played with it the next day. I was impressed. The optics were clear. I was happy. I can see airplanes land about 10 miles away. It was getting shaky and fuzzy that far away but I can see them. I’d never really use them that far but that goes to show how powerful this spotting scope is and it’s clear.I also ordered an Amazon brand 60 inch tripod. It’s a must have if you’re going to use this spotting scope. It’ll be less shaky compared to just holding it with your hand. I’d buy it again if I had to.

Overall rating 3 stars
January 5, 2019

Comment:

This is for the Ultima 65 – angled eyepiece. My application is birding. I’ve had such good luck with my Celestron Nature DX 8×42 binoculars that I have purchased 4 pairs; three for gifts), so I when I needed an inexpensive spotting scope I decided to try the Ultima 65. It worked okay, but even though I am pretty frugal, I decided to move up to the $500 price point and purchase a Vortex Diamondback 80mm -angled eyepiece. The latter costs 4 times as much and is definitely heavier, but the brightness, clarity, better case, and unconditional lifetime warranty carried the day for me in a side-by-side comparison. Your mileage my differ. For me the image quality and brightness at higher magnifications need to be good enough to justify lugging the scope into the field, versus decent binoculars. For me, the Ultima 65 doesn’t meet that standard. One plus for the Ultima 65 is reasonable eye relief. At 18X I was able to get a full field of view with my glasses on and the eyecups folded down. As magnification increased I was still able to see the center of part of the image, with vignetting of the outer regions. From 30X on up, I had to remove my glasses to see anything useful. This is a pain, but it may be the nature of the beast as I have the same issue with other spotting scopes I have used on birding trips. Another thing: for me the position of the focus knob is buried too deeply in the barrel of the telescope and difficult to use compared to other scopes. This complicates the effort to get a sharp image. The focus mechanism is also extremely slow, taking lots and lots of turns to get into the right range, which makes the location of the focus knob even more inconvenient. The feel of the zoom dial is very stiff, making it more difficult to stay on target when zooming. This all sounds a little negative, but I can envision applications where this scope would be satisfactory, but I don’t think serious birding is one of them. If you’re serious about getting a spotting scope for birding, plan on spending on the order of $500 (or more!).

Overall rating 3 stars
April 13, 2019

Comment:

I bought this for target shooting, primarily 5.56 at distances of 100 and 300 yards. At 100 yards, the target is very clear and with enough magnification to easily see 556 holes in white paper targets. At 300 yards, with full magnification, the focus is a little fuzzy and I could not see 556 holes in white paper targets but when I used splattter targets with yellow on a black background, I was able to make out my hits. Not crystal clear but enough to make the necessary adjustments. Can’t see this scope working for shooting much beyond 300 yards but 300 or less, I think it works well enough for the money.

Description
This Celestron Ultima 65 52248 refractor-style spotting scope features a 35mm camera T-adapter, so you can attach a 35mm SLR camera to snap photos of subjects as you observe them through the scope's 18-55x magnification-capable multicoated optics.
Details
Details
General
Product Name Ultima 65 18-55x 45 Degree Spotting Scope
Color Green
Color Category Green
Model Number 52248
Brand Celestron
Dimension
Product Depth 5 inches
Product Height 5 inches
Product Weight 2.3 pounds
Product Width 16 inches
Additional Dimension
Objective Lens Diameter 65 millimeters
Connectivity
USB Port(s) No
Performance
Water Resistant Yes
Maximum Depth Of Water Resistance 0 feet
Feature
Scope Type Straight
Lens Coating Coated
Integrated Digital Camera No
Warranty
Manufacturer's Warranty - Parts Lifetime limited
Manufacturer's Warranty - Labor Lifetime limited
Imaging
Magnification 55 times
Field Of View 89 degrees
Exposure Control
Minimum Viewing Range 20 feet
Other
Angle of View (Maximum Magnification) 1.7 degrees
Field of View (Maximum Magnification) 89 feet per 1000 yards
Angle of View (Minimum Magnification) 0.8 degrees
Field of View (Minimum Magnification) 38 feet per 1000 yards
UPC 050234522489
The Celestron company offers users to check out 52248. The features of 52248, in addition to their interesting design solution, make us pleased with their performance and functionality. Best solution for both house and office. Many customers already appreciated and left 52248 reviews available on our service. Price comparison, that is also offered by our service, helps profitably purchase Celestron 52248. Buy (Celestron 52248 or Ultima 65 18-55x 45 Degree Spotting Scope) with benefits.
My review Celestron Ultima 65 18-55x 45 Degree Spotting Scope 52248

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